About

Photo: Ryan RedCorn

Dr. Kari A. B. Chew (she/her) is a Chickasaw citizen and Chikashshanompa’ (Chickasaw language) learner based in the Chickasaw Nation. As a scholar-educator, Dr. Chew’s work contributes to intergenerational Indigenous language revitalization and reclamation. Engaging decolonizing methodologies, she researches technology to support Indigenous languages, pedagogies for Indigenous language learning and teaching, and Indigenous language-in-education policy. She currently works closely with the Chickasaw Nation on language education projects, including Chickasaw Rosetta Stone and curricula for high school world language courses. She holds a doctorate in Indigenous Language Education and Linguistics from the University of Arizona.

Writing

Chew, K. A. B., Leonard, W. Y., & Rosenblum, D. (forthcoming). Decolonizing Indigenous language pedagogies: Additional language learning and teaching. In J. Carmen, M. Mithun, & K. Rice (Eds.), Handbook of languages and linguistics of North America (pp. 822–843). Mouton de Gruyter.

Chew, K. A. B. (2022). Chikashshanompaat bílli’ya: The Chickasaw language is forever. In J. Garcia, V. Shirley, and H. Kulago (Eds.), Indigenizing education: Transformative theories and possibilities in Indigenous communities America (pp. 105–120). Information Age Publishing. [post-print version]

Chew, K. A. B., Hinson, J. D. (Lokosh), Morgan, J. (2022). Centering relationality in online Indigenous language learning: Reflecting on the creation and use of Rosetta Stone Chickasaw. Language Documentation & Conservation, 16, 228–258. http://hdl.handle.net/10125/74679

Chew, K. A. B., McIvor, O., Hemlock, K., Marinakis, A. (2022). Persistence in Indigenous language work during the COVID-19 pandemic. AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples. https://doi.org/10.1177/11771801221122820

Chew, K. A. B., & Hinson, J. D. (Lokosh). (2022). Chikashsha alhihaat Chikashshanompa’ anompoli katihma: Chickasaws are still speaking Chikashshanompa’. Living Languages/Lenguas Vivas/Línguas Vivas, 1(1), 24–40. https://doi.org/10.7275/qch7-0m35

Chew, K. A. B., & Tennell, C. (2022). Sustaining and revitalizing Indigenous languages in Oklahoma public schools: Educational sovereignty in language policy and planning. Current Issues in Language Planning. https://doi.org/10.1080/14664208.2022.2037289 [post-print version]

Chew, K. A. B. (2021). #KeepOurLanguagesStrong: Indigenous language revitalization on social media during the early COVID-19 pandemic. Language Documentation & Conservation, 15, 257–284. http://hdl.handle.net/10125/24976

Chew, K. A. B., & Hinson, J. D. (Lokosh) (2021). Chikashshaat asilhlhat holissochi [Chickasaws are asking and writing]: Enacting Indigenous protocols in academic research and writing. Native American Indigenous Studies, 8(2), 1–28. https://doi.org/10.5749/natiindistudj.8.2.0001 [post-print version]

Chew, K. A. B., & McIvor, O. (2021). Innovation, reflection, and future directions: An introduction to the special issue on Indigenous language revitalization. WINHEC: International Journal of Indigenous Education Scholarship, 16(1), 4–11. https://doi.org/10.18357/wj1202120272

Chew, K. A. B., & Nicholas, S. E. (2021). Cultivating enduring and reciprocal relationships in academia: An Indigenous mentor-mentee model. Journal of Comparative and International Higher Education, 13(3), 65–89. https://doi.org/10.32674/jcihe.v13iSummer.3254

Chew, K. A. B., Nicholas, S. E., Galla, C. K., Kawaiʻaeʻa, K., Leonard, W. Y., & Silva, W. D. L. (2021). Storying an interconnected web of relationships in Indigenous language reclamation work and scholarship. WINHEC: International Journal of Indigenous Education Scholarship, 16(1), 334–375. https://doi.org/10.18357/wj1202120291

McIvor, O., Chew, K. A. B., Stacey, K. I. (2020). Indigenous language learning impacts, challenges and opportunities in COVID19 times. AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples, 16(4), 409–412. https://doi.org/10.1177/1177180120970930

Chew, K. A. B. (2020). Letter from the Indigenous guest editor. The Arbutus Review, 11(1), 5–6. https://doi.org/10.18357/tar111202019685

Chew, K. A. B., Anthony-Stevens, V., LeClair-Diaz, A., Nicholas, S. E., Sobotta, A., & Stevens, P. (2019). Enacting hope through narratives of Indigenous language and culture reclamation. Transmotion, 5(1), 132–151. https://doi.org/10.22024/UniKent/03/tm.570

Chew, K. A. B. (2019). Weaving words: Conceptualizing language reclamation through culturally-significant metaphor. Canadian Journal of Native Education, 41(1), 168–185. https://doi.org/10.14288/cjne.v41i1.196608

McCarty, T. L., Nicholas, S. E., Chew, K. A. B., Diaz, N., Leonard, W. Y., & White, L. (2018). Hear our languages, hear our voices: Stories of resilience and justice in Indigenous-language reclamation. Dædalus, 147(2), 160–172. https://doi.org/10.1162/DAED_a_00499

Chew, K. A. B., & Anthony-Stevens, V. (2017). Teaching from a place of hope in Indigenous education. Anthropology News, 58(2), e265–e269. https://doi.org/10.1111/AN.383 [post-print version]

Chew, K. A. B. (2016). Chikashshanompa’ ilanompohó̲li bíyyi’ka’chi [We will always speak the Chickasaw language]: Considering the vitality and efficacy of Chickasaw language reclamation [Doctoral dissertation, the University of Arizona]. UA Campus Repository.
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/621788

Chew, K. A. B., Hicks Greendeer, N., & Keliiaa, C. (2015). Claiming space: An autoethnographic study of Indigenous graduate students engaged in language reclamation. International Journal of Multicultural Education, 17(2), 73–91. https://doi.org/10.18251/ijme.v17i2.966

Chew, K. A. B. (2015). Family at the heart of Chickasaw language reclamation. American Indian Quarterly, 39(2), 154–179. https://www.muse.jhu.edu/article/578010 [post-print version]

Chew, K. A. B. (2014). Chikashshanompa’ ilanompola’chi [We will speak Chickasaw]: The significance of Chickasaw language decline and revitalization. The Journal of Chickasaw History and Culture, 16(2), 26–29. https://www.proquest.com/openview/6434c4bf05407e8a1a78b100307cd13c/ 

Lewis, K. A. (2011). Pomanompa’ kilanompolika̲ chokma (It is good that we speak our
language): Motivations to revitalize Chikashshanompa’ (Chickasaw language) across
generations [Unpublished master’s thesis]. University of California, Los Angeles.

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